HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Gas (10 msgs / 242 lines)
1) From: dennis staab
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Got two 5 gallon propane tanks filled yesterday, how does $30.00 sound =
to you, about $3.00 a gallon! Seems to me Pres. Bush, said awhile back =
that the U.S.A. was loaded with natural gas, but they screw us away!!!!!
                                                                         =
                                         Dennis

2) From: EuropaChris
Propane doesn't come from natural gas.  It actually comes from oil production.
Either way, oil prices AND natural gas prices are going through the roof.
Chris
"dennis staab"  wrote:
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3) From: Michael Vanecek
An alternative is to build a Gobar digester and collect methane. Scrub 
it of hydrogen sulfates, CO2 and water and you have a perfectly 
sustainable and potentially free alternative for your roasting needs... 
If you use it right away, you don't really even need to scrub it. Just 
replace metal fittings and parts periodically.http://ww2.green-trust.org:8383/2000/biofuel/methane.htm<-- right-click ">http://www.schoolresult.com/chemistry/fuels1.htmhttp://www.rudimentsofwisdom.com/pages/biogas.htmhttp://ww2.green-trust.org:8383/2000/biofuel/methane.htm<-- right-click 
on the first image of the biogas digester and select view image and 
you'll be rewarded with a much larger image.
Alternatively, you can produce your own woodgas too from scrap lumber 
from construction sites. Easy to do, safety precautions considered of 
course.
And finally, since one can melt alumunum and other metals with charcoal 
(also easy to make from scrap wood) and a blower, why not integrate that 
wonderful heat-source into a roaster?http://www.backyardmetalcasting.com/book_fp.htmlhttp://home.earthlink.net/~jschwytzer/charcoal_furnace.html
And heck - I'm sure even a very well constructed solar roaster may be an 
option. I know of one fella who roasted cacao in one that got to 230F - 
surely with more refinement you can build a solar roaster that can reach 
450F - after all, some experimental solar projects reach into the 
thousands of degrees...
So, sure - gas is expensive. So what. It's inconvenient, these prices, 
but don't let that stop you. Be inspired to find alternatives... After 
all, we have folks building their own roasters. It's not that far of a 
stretch then to locate or form sources of fuel alternatives...
Cheers,
Mike
Chris Beck wrote:
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4) From: gin
it is the mystery of big business, actually it is no mystery at all, we get 
screwed.
it makes no difference the root/base cost we will be charged what the 
traffic can and will pay
look at phone service, cell service, gps, gas, food or whatever we will be 
charged the max because we can pay and do.
A medication is 1.50 here and any where outside the us it's 1/2 or less,
another list I am sure,
ginny
At 12:17 PM 2/27/2004 -0500, you wrote:
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5) From: Ron Kyle
Yes its out of sight. In just 4 yrs my natural gas bill has tripled. I also
think the cost of drinking coffee has also tripled. O)

6) From: Oaxaca Charlie
 Wellsir, me and Pecan Jim are roasting with wood.
 A friend I haven't seen in some time was telling me once about
a Beduin camel caravan he joined up with awhile back,(would have
been early 60's) and they were gathering all the camel dung,
stuffing it into inner tubes, and cooking everything along the
way with gas from those tubes. Roasting their coffee, too.
  Charlie, wishing my Hundai ran on cow poo
--- Michael Vanecek  wrote:
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=====
Brick Oven Roasting in British Columbia
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7) From: Ed Needham
I'm picturing a very large lens and lots of shiny stuff offset with lots of
black absorbent stuff.  Put the beans on a conveyor and the top of my garage
becomes a roaster!
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

8) From: Michael Vanecek
Giggle - I was picturing a little kid with a magnifying glass burning 
the antenea off of ants. I actually looked around for a magnifying glass 
to go after a bean to see what would happen. :)
But, a bunch of flat or slightly curved mirrors placed in a parabola 
configuration, beans in a rotating metal container mounted at the focal 
point. Perhaps a tempurature measuring device - infrarad measuring 
device would be safest. Throw in a flux capacitor for kicks. :) Classic 
radiant heat type roaster. Well... perhaps not so classic...
Grin,
Mike
Well... it would be fun to try anyway...
Ed Needham wrote:
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9) From: Ed Needham
I guess I'll have to upgrade my solar panels to 3.21 jigawatts to handle the
flux capacitors.
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

10) From: Michael Vanecek
Naw, just go to your local nickle-and-dime and pick up some plutonium. 
It's the 21st century after all, right? :)
But then, were we're going, we don't need... Starbucks. :)
Yeah - we gots lotsa sun here. I think a few experimentation on solar 
roasters may be in order. I'll start with a magnifying glass and a bean 
to watch it happen, then move to perhaps a large fresnel lens and a 
modified tuna-can, then work on synchronized reflectors and a chili can 
with a little motor to rotate it. Could be kinda cool. Or hot. :)
Grin,
Mike
Ed Needham wrote:
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